Media Roundup: Okkervil River return!

And the concert announcements keep coming! After all-but stealing the show when opening for the New Pornographers at the Orpheum two months ago, Okkervil River have already planned their return trip to Madison. The band will headline a show at the Barrymore Theatre on Sunday, September 14, in support of the impending release of their new album, The Stand Ins, on September 9. with tickets already available. This one is a sure sell-out, so don’t miss this one, kids. (Check out this piece from Paste Magazine for more info on the tour and Okkervil’s forthcoming release).

As discussed in previous entries, last evening’s Silos concert at High Noon was a benefit for Drew Glackin, the band’s bassist who tragically passed away earlier this year from a thyroid condition. Isthmus’ Marc Eisen candidly discussed his experiences with Glackin in a touching editorial earlier this week, and it is certainly worth a read. Rest in peace, Mr. Glackin.

Two upcoming shows in town, Ingrid Michaelson tomorrow (Saturday) evening and Stephen Marley next Wednesday, June 11, both at the Barrymore, have also been garnering local media attention this past week. Read Michaelson’s interview from the Capital Times and story in the Isthmus, as well as the Cap Times’ Marley profile.

As it has been underscored in many previous entries on this blog, I thought it would mentioning the Rolling Stone’s interesting feature on the “new music economy” — a world where it’s beginning to seem that some bands can earn more cash licensing tunes for commercials than selling albums. The music industry is a very different animal than it was even five years ago, and It’s an important read for musicians and music fans alike.

Bogged down at the office and haven’t made it to as many shows as you’ve liked? As usual, below are links, reviews and interviews from the past week of shows, including the Nels Cline Singers, the everybodyfields and Langhorne Slim.

And that’s the roundup! Have any thoughts on recent shows? Photos you’d like to share? Let us know, either through email or by leaving a comment, because we’d love to hear from you.

Will NOT Comply: Wilco guitarist Nels Cline sticks with non-commercial fare

I’ve been fortunate to be involved with every Wilco show since their first show in Madison at Club de Wash in November 1994. The band had just formed out of the acrimonious split that occurred between Uncle Tupelo frontmen Jeff Tweedy and Jay Farrar. I had a birds-eye view of the last throes of that collaboration at an Uncle Tupelo show I presented at the Barrymore in March 1994, one of the last shows the band did before breaking up.

Jay Farrar (vocalist, guitarist), Jeff Tweedy (bassist, guitarist, vocalist), Mike Heidorn (drums)

The original members of Uncle Tupelo sitting From left to right: Jay Farrar (vocalist, guitarist), Jeff Tweedy (bassist, guitarist, vocalist), Mike Heidorn (drums)

Jeff and Jay at that point were not talking to each other. The tension was palpable, with Jay walled off and aloofly cocooned, and Jeff noticeably upbeat — perhaps relieved the end was near. I remember that the Bottle Rockets opened the show, and vaguely recall Brian Henneman joining them onstage. That the line-up, apart from Jay, essentially became the band that only months later debuted as Wilco. (I also remember staying up all night at a hotel on E. Wash — the Aloha?–with Jeff and the guys, joined by Mark Spencer of Blood Oranges — who was touring with Freedy Johnston. The Bushmills did us in as we watched the 1967 Casino Royale spoof on late-night television — starring Peter Sellers, Woody Allen and Orson Welles — it was a hoot.)

A lot has happened to Wilco since, more than can be captured in a single paragraph. The Reprise to Nonesuch saga resulting in the ground-breaking Yankee Hotel Foxtrot — expertly captured in the great documentary I Am Trying To Break Your Heart, a Grammy nod for A Ghost is Born, and several line-up changes, including the addition of avante-garde jazz guitarist Nels Cline.

Jeff Tweedy & Wilco

Jeff Tweedy & Wilco

That Nels would join Wilco in 2004 was no real surprise Wilco fans, even those who preferred the early days of A.M. and Being There Cline is highly revered in No Wave and free jazz circles, an area of interest for Tweedy and Co. spurred by their collaboration with NYC producer/musician and Chicago transplant Jim O’Rourke. (O’Rourke and Tweedy had recorded a record together with drummer Glenn Kotche under the rubric Loose Fur, which led to Kotche joining Wilco in 2001.) Cline was also a member of The Geraldine Fibbers in the 1990s, a band that played the East End around 1997. I’m not sure, but they might have opened for indie supergroup Golden Smog, another one of Tweedy’s side projects.

Drums

Nels Cline Singers: Nels Cline (guitar) Devin Hoff (Bass) Scott Amendola (Drums)

Fans of Thurston Moore, Marc Ribot, Elliot Sharp, Albert Ayler, Ornette Coleman — you are strongly encouraged to check out Monday’s show with The Nels Cline Singers at High Noon on Monday, June 2. An instrumental trio, The Nels Cline Singers offer an evening of improvisational jazz that rarely comes to Madison, at least not since 1993-94, when John Zorn visited Madison twice in the span of six months.

Doors or this mind-blowing show open at 7pm, and Painted Saints (featuring Paul Fonfara — interviewed in this week’s Onion) kicks off the evening at 8pm. This is an 18+ show. Tickets are $16 adv and $18 dos, and are available HERE. See you there!

– Tag Evers