Celebrate The High Noon’s 5th With Crystal Antlers!

High Noon Saloon

Has it really only been 5 years?!  The High Noon Saloon has been such an essential player in the Madison music scene that it’s hard to imagine a time without it!  Well, believe it or not, today marks the venue’s 5th anniversary of hosting phenomenal local, national, and international artists on its stage.

Click here to find out how The High Noon Saloon is celebrating the big five!

Photos from The Cabinet of Wonders

Wes and Eugene’s Cabinet of Wonders came to town Saturday night, providing both music and laughter to those in attendance at the High Noon Saloon. Musician John Wesley Harding and comedian Eugene Mirman headlined and hosted the evening’s festivities. The “cast of thousands” included Victor DeLorenzo (of the Violent Femmes) and his band Prestige Atlantic Impulse, Chicago comedian Mark Bazer, and The Zombeatles…an undead version of Madison’s own Gomers. Here are some photos from the revelry:

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This Week’s Shows- Ray, Ryan, Relient, and More

This is a busy week for great, diverse music around Madison. Whether you’re in the mood for high-energy pop punk (Relient K), a little alt-country (Ryan Adams and The Cardinals), want to get funky (Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk), or anything in between, True Endeavors has the ticket!

Thursday, October 2

RELIENT K


“…smart blend of punk pop and power pop, weaving together influences as diverse as the Beach Boys, Blink-182 and Fountains of Wayne.” – Los Angeles Times

Genre: Rock/Pop Punk/Alternative

Similar to: Dogwood, Last Tuesday, Slick Shoes
with special guests
LUDO, THIS PROVIDENCE, HOUSE OF HEROES
7pm
Barrymore Theatre
608.241.8864
$16 adv $18 dos – all ages
BUY TICKETS NOW !
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STATE RADIO

Genre: Rock/Reggae/Indie

Similar to: Dispatch, OAR, Jack Johnson

“Playing an interesting blend of rock and reggae, State Radio use their music to express their political stance on a variety of issues affecting our world today.” – SHOUT! webzine

with BONGO LOVE
9:00 pm
High Noon Saloon
608.268.1122
$15 adv and dos — 18+
BUY TICKETS NOW !
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DEAD CONFEDERATE


Genre: Rock/Psychedelic

Similar to: My Morning Jacket, Kings of Leon

“Both in name and in sound, Dead Confederate aims to further the cause of Southern rock. The Georgia band does indeed mix its Neil Young with its Lynyrd Skynyrd, but underneath all those heavy chords is a group of guys raised on Nirvana, Sonic Youth, and other titans of early-’90s alt-rock.” – NPR

with special guests
CATFISH HAVEN
plus
FRESHWATER COLLINS
9:00pm
The Annex
608.256.7750
$8 adv and dos – 18+
BUY TICKETS NOW !
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Friday, October 3

SUNSET RUBDOWN

Genre: Indie

Similar to: Tapes n’ Tapes, Wolf Parade, Arcade Fire, Modest Mouse

“Whereas Wolf Parade play a weird, schizoid rhythm & blues, Sunset Rubdown play more with collage, chamber rock, the Scott Walker wing of the singer-songwriter genre.” – Aji Signal

with CASIOTONE FOR THE PAINFULLY ALONE
9:30pm
The Annex
608.256.7750
$10 adv $12 – 18+
BUY TICKETS NOW !
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RAY LAMONTAGNE


Genre: Acoustic/Folk

Similar to: Iron and Wine, Hayward Williams, Joe Purdy

“He has this vulnerable, raspy, velvety, pure voice. He absolutely pours his soul into his music, which is always the most inspiring things you can see in a live show. He feels each word and resonates with each chord.” – I Am Fuel, You Are Friends blog

with special guest
LEONA NAESS
7:30pm
Wisconsin Union Theater
608.262.2201
Currently sold out! Some tickets may be released day of show.
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Sunday, October 5

ANI DIFRANCO

Genre: Folk

Similar to: Mary Lou Lord, Utah Phillips, Tracy Chapman

“…she has the kind of enthusiasm, intensity and clarity that gets things done.” -Guardian UK

with PETER MULVEY
8:00pm
Wisconsin Union Theater
608.262.2201
$35 reserved seating ($32.50 UW-Madison students) – all ages
BUY TICKETS NOW !
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True Endeavors and JAM Productions
present
LIVE IN CONCERT
CARDINALS


Genre: Rock/Alternative/Country

Similar to: Wilco, Neko Case, Gillian Welch, Mason Jennings

“The Cardinals are out to rule arenas. Everything they played had a grand, mythic sweep, with epic guitar workouts and larger-than-life choruses.” – Boston Herald
Featuring:
Ryan Adams
Neal Casal
Chris Feinstein
Jon Graboff
Brad Pemberton
8:30pm
Overture Hall
608.258.4141
$35 reserved seating

BUY TICKETS NOW !
(There is a six-ticket limit for this concert!)
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Tuesday October 7

IVAN NEVILLE’S DUMPSTAPHUNK

Genre: Funk

Similar to: The Meters, Lee Diamond, Dr. John

“Ivan Neville is the funkiest collection of human gumbo ever assembled on the planet.” —Bonnie Raitt
with special guests
THE GOMERS FUNK MACHINE
8pm
High Noon Saloon
608.268.1122
$15 – 21+
BUY TICKETS NOW !
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Wednesday, October 8

SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS

Genre: Rock/Garage/Surf

Similar to: Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Reverend Horton Heat, Nashville Pussy, The Legendary Shack Shakers

“For more than a decade, the three North Carolinians in Southern Culture on the Skids have been honing their party-hearty mix of rockabilly swagger, surf-rock speed and countrified melodies.” – Rolling Stone

with tba
8pm
High Noon Saloon
608.268.1122
$13 adv $15 dos — 21+
BUY TICKETS NOW !
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Thursday, October 9

THE KOOKS

Genre: Alternative/Indie/Reggae

Similar to: The Kinks, Supergrass, The Thrills, Sam Roberts

“Though they tend to elicit comparisons to the Beatles, Oasis, and a few other noteworthy Brits, in the grand, high school yearbook of rock, it would seem that the class prophecy has appointed the Kooks inheritors of the mantle previously borne by the Kinks.” – PopMatters

with THE WHIGS
8:00 pm
Barrymore Theatre
608.241.8864
$17.50 adv $20 dos – all ages
BUY TICKETS NOW !

Free mp3 download – a live version of ‘Always Where I Need To Be’

“Tag’s Deal”- or How I Became a Concert Promoter (for those too timid to ask)

I look forward to July 20 with some trepidation.

No, it’s not because we have Immortal Technique at High Noon on Sunday. We do hip hop shows on a fairly regular basis, and we generally have less problems – the occasional obnoxious tag (as in graffiti) notwithstanding – than, say, at a Yonder Mountain show packed with over-served hippies.

July 20 is the anniversary of my move to Madison twenty years ago. I moved here from Dayton, Ohio to pursue a doctorate in Agricultural Economics under the guidance of Dan Bromley, a thoughtful Natural Resource economist who was also one of the few remaining expositors of the Institutional School of economics. Institutional Economics, with its holistic multidisciplinary approach, offered an alluring respite from the arid confines of neo-classical orthodoxy and its extreme reliance on mathematical equations and statistics. I looked forward to studying with Dan in the hopes that my interest in economics as a means of grappling with the complex issues facing us – particularly global environmental crises — would lead to a career in academia.

Man plans, God laughs. Before I could get to the good stuff, I had to pass muster in the form of prelims, and in order to do that, I had to take classes in Micro, Macro, and Econometrics. My math training upon arrival was minimal – I had never before seen a proof. In short, I was screwed. For the first time in my life, I was a failure.

In retrospect, I should have transferred to Sociology or Political Science, but I tried sticking it out. I could write well, and consequently had a paper published shortly after my arrival. I was invited to present my ideas at a couple of conferences, and I ended up getting featured in a video shot at an academic conference exploring the emerging discipline of Ecological Economics, one that was shown on college campuses across the country, even making its way to the Clinton White House (true story.)

But then more reality set in. I fell in love, hard, only to see it end in a slow-motion train wreck. And my parents died, both of them, within six months of each other. I was in a world of pain.

So I dropped out and became a concert promoter.

I sometimes think I subconsciously started up this business so I could drink on the job, which I did in the early days to good measure. It’s an occupational hazard, one that I now try to avoid, but then it helped me when little else could. Of course, what drinking gave, it took back and then some.

I intended when sitting down to write to ruminate about my early recollections of the Madison music scene, kind of a “then and now” retrospective. I do remember the first time I went to O’Cayz. I can’t remember the band I went to see, but I do remember thinking it was a long walk from campus. I saw Negativland at Club D, Fishbone at Headliners, Mahlathini & the Mahotella Queens and King Sunny Ade & the African Beats at the Barrymore — as many shows as I could fit in while wading through those dense math equations of my early grad school days.

I remember Phil Gnarly & the Tough Guys at the Wagon Wheel, Marques Bovre at the Crystal, the Indigo Girls playing the Terrace in front of what seemed like 6000 people, Lou Reed signing autographs at Club De Wash, the Gomers doing their crazy theme nights, also at Club D.

Bunkys, R& R Station and GS Vigs have all been torn down. Inn Cahoots became The Chamber, which became Mass Appeal, which became the King Club, giving way, most recently, to Woofs. Club de Wash burned down on a miserable February morning, and, not five years later, the same fate took out O’Cayz.

All I can say is thank God for Cathy’s perseverance.

O' Cayz Corral, Post- Fire

O' Cayz Corral, Post- Fire

I’m sitting upstairs at High Noon while I write this, listening to Sarah Borges & the Broken Singles rock out and thinking about how I used to drink Budweiser while waiting for the guys at No Name Printing in the basement of the old Buy ‘n’ Sell — which stood in this very spot — to finish up my flyers so I could go hit State Street.

I wonder what life would have been like as a college professor, if my original intentions upon landing here 20 years ago had been fulfilled. It was my dream to be a public intellectual, to get paid to read and write and think. I still have my regrets, that restless longing for what might have been.

On the other hand, I wouldn’t have had the life experiences I’ve had. I get to chat with Lyle Lovett, hang out with Patti Smith, witness the ongoing explosive genius of an artist like Ryan Adams. It’s not all like that; there’s a lot of endless work, lots of nights like tonight with 50 people in the house and a few hundred shy in the till. But, all in all, it doesn’t suck.

I still remember the first time I drove into Madison, down Park Street until it dead-ended into Lake Mendota, lost and not a little bit scared. I’ve watched the buildings go up, the skyline change, the city grow and prosper. And, I like to think, I’ve grown up and changed with it.

I’m glad I was bad at math and good at rock. And I’m very glad I moved to Madison twenty years ago.

Thanks to all who have supported our shows over the years and continue, so generously, to do so.

Tag Evers

Tag Evers

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